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Icon Pack - Material Design In XAML 1.4

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This article is about release 1.4 of Material Design In XAML Toolkit is a full icon pack. Icon design is a skill itself and finding or creating good icons when designing an application can be a time consuming task.

Release 1.4 of Material Design In XAML Toolkit is a full icon pack. Icon design is a skill itself and finding or creating good icons when designing an application can be a time consuming task. To help in this regard I am pleased to announce that the entire Material Design Icons collection is now included in the library.

Material Design Icons

It’s a great collection, containing over 1,400 icons, including many of the standard icons we see on Android phones and many more additional icons added by its own community. It’s worthwhile heading over to the website to get an overview of the icons, and there’s a search feature to help you track down the icon you’re after.

Using the icons in your WPF application is easy. Assuming you’ve already installed Material Design In XAML Toolkit, the XAML is as simple as:

  1. <materialDesign:PackIcon Kind="ShareVariant" />  
To give you: 

The icons are SVG based, so scale nicely:
  1. <materialDesign:PackIcon Kind="ThumbUp" Height="24" Width="24" />  
  2. <materialDesign:PackIcon Kind="ThumbUp" Height="36" Width="36" />  
  3. <materialDesign:PackIcon Kind="ThumbUp" Height="48" Width="48" />  
Like

You can see the entire icon collection in the main demo application:

Icon Pack

MahApps

Furthermore, the base class for the icon has been added to ControlzEx (credit to @punker76 for this idea), so in the future you may well see mahApps use the same API for Modern Design Language icons, giving WPF developers a common, simple icon XAML syntax:
  1. <materialDesign:PackIcon Kind="SomeMaterialIcon" />  
  2. <mahApps:PackIcon Kind="SomeModernIcon" />  
Release Details

Various other fixes, enhancements, performance improvements have recently gone into the library. Versions 1.3.1, 1.3.2, and now 1.4.0 contain some welcome community contributions. To see details of all changes hit the Releases GitHub page.
posted Feb 3, 2016 by Jdk

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I've managed to get the existing WPF controls; DatePicker & Calendar themed as part of Material Design in XAML Toolkit as described in this blog post.

But the fun part was cranking a couple of brand new controls to build the Material Design time picker experience:

  • TimePicker
  • Clock

These are sibling controls to the existing DatePicker and Calendar controls. I wanted to keep the API experience similar so you can dive straight in without any kind of learning curve. The Clock can be used in isolation, or use the DatePicker for an easy picker/popup/drop down behaviour.

Here's a static glimpse at the picker:

Material Design Time Picker

And here's a gif of the clock in action:

Material Design Clock Demo

There's nothing complicated about using these, but you will need to get Material Design In XAML Toolkit referenced and set up in your app. Follow the initial tutorial, and head over to GitHub to download the source/examples project.

READ MORE

Part 3 Continues:

We've seen many requirements where a page has two TreeView controls and the left TreeView displays a list of items. Using a button, we can use items from the left TreeView and add them to the right sideTreeView. Using the remove button we can remove items from the right side TreeView and add them back to the left side TreeView

This sample shows how to move items from one TreeView to another. The final page looks as in the following. The Add button adds the selected item to the right side TreeView and removes it from the left side TreeView. The Remove button removes the selected item from the right side TreeView and adds back to the left side TreeView.

TreeView
                                                                                    Figure 7

right side TreeView
                                                                                 Figure 8

The following XAML code generates two TreeView controls and two Button controls.

  1. <TreeView Margin="11,13,355,11" Name="LeftTreeView" />  
    <TreeView Margin="0,13,21,11" Name="RightTreeView" HorizontalAlignment="Right" Width="216" />  
    <Button Name="AddButton" Height="23" Margin="248,78,261,0" VerticalAlignment="Top"  
            Click="AddButton_Click">Add >></Button>  
    <Button Name="RemoveButton" Margin="248,121,261,117"   
            Click="RemoveButton_Click"><< Remove</Button>  

On the Window loaded event, we create and load data items to the TreeView by setting the ItemsSourceproperty to an ArrayList

  1. private void Window_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)  
    {  
        // Get data from somewhere and fill in my local ArrayList  
        myDataList = LoadTreeViewData();  
        // Bind ArrayList with the TreeView  
        LeftTreeView.ItemsSource = myDataList;              
    }  
      
    /// <summary>  
    /// Generate data. This method can bring data from a database or XML file  
    /// or from a Web service or generate data dynamically  
    /// </summary>  
    /// <returns></returns>  
    private ArrayList LoadTreeViewData()  
    {  
        ArrayList itemsList = new ArrayList();  
        itemsList.Add("Coffie");  
        itemsList.Add("Tea");  
        itemsList.Add("Orange Juice");  
        itemsList.Add("Milk");  
        itemsList.Add("Mango Shake");  
        itemsList.Add("Iced Tea");  
        itemsList.Add("Soda");  
        itemsList.Add("Water");  
        return itemsList;  
    }  

In the Add button click event handler, we get the value and index of the selected item in the left sideTreeView and add that to the right side TreeView and remove that item from the ArrayList that is our data source. The ApplyBinding method simply removes the current binding of the TreeView and rebinds with the updated ArrayList.

  1. private void RemoveButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)  
    {  
        // Find the right item and it's value and index  
        currentItemText = RightTreeView.SelectedValue.ToString();  
        currentItemIndex = RightTreeView.SelectedIndex;  
        // Add RightTreeView item to the ArrayList  
        myDataList.Add(currentItemText);  
      
      RightTreeView.Items.RemoveAt(RightTreeView.Items.IndexOf(RightTreeView.SelectedItem));  
      
        // Refresh data binding  
        ApplyDataBinding();  

Similarly, on the Remove button click event handler, we get the selected item text and index from the right side TreeView and add that to the ArrayList and remove from the right side TreeView.

We use the Northwind.mdf database that comes with SQL Server. In our application, we will read data from the Customers table. The Customers table columns look like this. 

Customers table columns
                                           

Note:  Part 5 will update soon.  

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A calendar control is used to create a visual calendar that lets users pick a date and fire an event on the selection of the date. This article demonstrates how to create and use a calendar control using XAML and C# in WPF.

Creating a Calendar

The Calendar element represents a calendar control in XAML as in the following:

  1. <Calendar/>  

The Calendar control is defined in the System.Windows.Controls namespace. When you drag and drop a Calendar control from the Toolbox to the page, the XAML code will look like the following code where you can see a Calendar XAML element has been added within the Grid element and its Width, Height, Name and VerticalAlignment and HorizontalAlignment attributes are set.

  1. <Grid>  
  2.    <Calendar Height="170" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="58,32,0,0"   
  3.       Name="calendar1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="180" />  
  4. </Grid>  

The default view of the Calendar control looks as in Figure 1. 


Figure 1

The Width and Height attributes of the Calendar element represent the width and the height of a Calendar. The Content attribute represents the text of a Calendar. The Name attribute represents the name of the control, that is a unique identifier of a control. 

The code snippet in Listing 1 creates a Calendar control and sets the name, height and width properties of a Calendar control. 

  1. <Calendar Name=" MonthlyCalendar" Height="30" Width="100" >  
  2. </Calendar>  

Listing 1

Display Modes

The DisplayMode property of the Calendar class represents the format of the display of a Calendar, that can be a month, year, or decade. Month is the default mode. Setting the DisplayMode to Year and Decade generates Figure 2 and Figure 3 respectively. 


Figure 2


Figure 3


The Month view that is also the default view looks as in Figure 4.


Figure 4

If you use an example of the Decade and click on the year 2008 in Figure 3, you will get another Calendar format with all the months in the year 2008 and if you click on any month, you will eventually get the month view of the Calendar. 

The following code snippet sets the DisplayMode property to Decade. 

  1. <Calendar DisplayMode="Decade">   
  2. </Calendar>  

Selection Modes and Selection Dates

The SelectedDate property represents the currently selected date. If multiple dates selection is true, the SelectedDates property represents a collection of currently selected dates. 

The SelectionMode of type CalendarSelectionMode enumeration represents the selection mode of calendar. Table 1 describes the CalendarSelectionMode enumeration and its members. 
 

CalendarSelectionModeDescription
NoneNo selections are allowed.
SingleDateOnly a single date can be selected, either by setting SelectedDate or the first value in SelectedDates. AddRange cannot be used.
SingleRangeA single range of dates can be selected. Setting SelectedDate, adding a date individually to SelectedDates, or using AddRange will clear all previous values from SelectedDates.
MultipleRangeMultiple non-contiguous ranges of dates can be selected. Adding a date individually to SelectedDates or using AddRange will not clear SelectedDates. Setting SelectedDate will still clear SelectedDates, but additional dates or range can then be added. Adding a range that includes some dates that are already selected or overlaps with another range results in the union of the ranges and does not cause an exception.

The following code snippet sets the SelectionMode property to a single range.

  1. <Calendar SelectionMode="SingleRange">  
  2. </Calendar>  

BlackoutDates

The BlackoutDates property of the Calendar class represents a collection of dates that are not available for selection. All non-selection dates are marked by a cross. For example, say in the month of March of the year 2010, we would like to block the dates from Jan 1st to Jan 7th and then all Sundays and the final calendar should look as in Figure 5.


Figure 5

Part 2 Continuous..

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The XAML TextBlock element represents a text block. The TextBlock control provides a lightweight control for displaying small amounts of flow content. This article shows how to use a TextBlock control in WPF.

Creating a TextBlock

The TextBlock element represents a WPF TextBlock control in XAML. 

  1. <TextBlock/>  

The Width and Height attributes of the TextBlock element represent the width and the height of aTextBlock. The Text property of the TextBlock element represents the content of a TextBlock. The Name attribute represents the name of the control that is a unique identifier of a control. The Foreground property sets the foreground color of contents. This control does not have a Background property. 

The code snippet in Listing 1 creates a TextBlock control and sets the name, height, width, foreground and content of a TextBlock control. Unlike a TextBox control, the TextBlock does not have a default border around it.

<TextBlock Name="TextBlock1" Height="30" Width="200"   

    Text="Hello! I am a TextBlock." Foreground="Red">  

</TextBlock>  

Listing 1

The output looks as in Figure 1

                                          output
                                                      Figure 1

As you can see from Figure 1, by default the TextBlock is placed in the center of the page. We can place aTextBlock control where we want using the MarginVerticalAlignment and HorizontalAlignment attributes that sets the margin, vertical alignment and horizontal alignment of a control. 

The code snippet in Listing 2 sets the position of the TextBlock control in the left top corner of the page. 

<TextBlock Name="TextBlock1" Height="30" Width="200"   
        Text="Hello! I am a TextBlock."   
        Margin="10,10,0,0" VerticalAlignment="Top"   
        HorizontalAlignment="Left">              
</TextBlock>  ​

                                                      Listing 2

Creating a TextBlock Dynamically

The code listed in Listing 3 creates a TextBlock control programmatically. First, it creates a TextBlockobject and sets its width, height, contents and foreground and later the TextBlock is added to theLayoutRoot

private void CreateATextBlock()  
{  
    TextBlock txtBlock = new TextBlock();  
    txtBlock.Height = 50;  
    txtBlock.Width = 200;  
    txtBlock.Text = "Text Box content";  
    txtBlock.Foreground = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Red);  
  
    LayoutRoot.Children.Add(txtBlock);  
} ​

                                                      Listing 3

Setting Fonts of TextBlock Contents

The FontSizeFontFamilyFontWeightFontStyle and FontStretch properties are used to set the font size, family, weight, style and stretch to the text of a TextBlock. The code snippet in Listing 4 sets the font properties of a TextBlock

  1. FontSize="14" FontFamily="Verdana" FontWeight="Bold"  

                                                      Listing 4

The new output looks as in Figure 4.

                                    hello

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Introduction

XAML provides UI element objects that can host child collection items. XAML also provides support to work with .NET collection types as data sources.

XAML Collections

A collection element usually is a parent control with child collection elements. The child collection elements are an ItemCollection that implements IList<object>. A ListBox element is a collection of ListBoxItem elements.

The code listing in Listing 1 creates a ListBox with a few ListBoxItems.

 

  1. <ListBox Margin="10,10,0,13" Name="listBox1" HorizontalAlignment="Left"  
  2. VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="194" Height="200">  
  3.   
  4. <ListBoxItem Content="Coffie"></ListBoxItem>  
  5. <ListBoxItem Content="Tea"></ListBoxItem>  
  6. <ListBoxItem Content="Orange Juice"></ListBoxItem>  
  7. <ListBoxItem Content="Milk"></ListBoxItem>  
  8. <ListBoxItem Content="Iced Tea"></ListBoxItem>  
  9. <ListBoxItem Content="Mango Shake"></ListBoxItem>  
  10.   
  11. </ListBox>  

 

Listing 1

The code listed above in Listing 1 generates Figure 1.

Figure 1

Add Collection Items

In the previous section, we saw how to add items to a ListBox at design-time from XAML. We can add items to a ListBox from the code.

Let's change our UI and add a TextBox and a button control to the page. See Listing 2.

 

  1. <TextBox Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="8,14,0,0"  
  2. Name="textBox1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="127" />  
  3. <Button Height="23" Margin="140,14,0,0" Name="button1" VerticalAlignment="Top" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Width="76" Click="button1_Click">  
  4. Add Item  
  5. </Button>  

 

Listing 2

The final UI looks like Figure 2.

Figure 2.

We can access collection items using the Items property. On the button click event handler, we add the content of the TextBox to the ListBox by calling the ListBox.Items.Add method. The code in Listing 3 adds the TextBox content to the ListBox items.

 

  1. private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)  
  2. {  
  3. listBox1.Items.Add(textBox1.Text);  
  4. }  

 

Listing 3

Now if you enter text into the TextBox and click the Add Item button, it will add the contents of the TextBox to the ListBox. See Figure 3.

Figure 3

Delete Collection Items

We can use the ListBox.Items.Remove or ListBox.Items.RemoveAt method to delete an item from the collection of items in the ListBox. The RemoveAt method takes the index of the item in the collection.

Now, we modify our application and add a new button called Delete Item. The XAML code for this button looks as in the following.

 

  1. <Button Height="23" Margin="226,14,124,0" Name="DeleteButton"  
  2. VerticalAlignment="Top" Click="DeleteButton_Click">  
  3. Delete Item</Button>  

 

Listing 4

The button click event handler looks like the following. On this button click, we find the index of the selected item and call the ListBox.Items.RemoveAt method as in the following.

 

  1. private void DeleteButton_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)  
  2. {  
  3. listBox1.Items.RemoveAt  
  4. (listBox1.Items.IndexOf(listBox1.SelectedItem));  
  5. }  

 

Listing 5

Collection Types

XAML allows developers to access .NET class library collection types from the scripting language. The code snippet in the Listing creates an array of String types, a collection of strings. To use the Array and String types, we must import the System namespace.

The code listing in Listing 6 creates an Array of String objects in XAML. As you may noticed in Listing 2, you must import the System namespace in XAML using the xmlns.

 

  1. <Window x:Class="XamlCollectionsSample.MainWindow"  
  2. xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"  
  3. xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"  
  4. xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"  
  5. Title="MainWindow" Height="402.759" Width="633.345">  
  6.   
  7. <Window.Resources>  
  8. <x:Array x:Key="AuthorList" Type="{x:Type sys:String}">  
  9. <sys:String>Mahesh Chand</sys:String>  
  10. <sys:String>Praveen Kumar</sys:String>  
  11. <sys:String>Raj Beniwal</sys:String>  
  12. <sys:String>Neel Beniwal</sys:String>  
  13. <sys:String>Sam Hobbs</sys:String>  
  14. </x:Array>  
  15. </Window.Resources>  
  16.   
  17. </Window>  

 

Listing 6

The ItemsSource property if ListBox in XAML is used to bind the ArrayList. See Listing 7.

 

  1. <ListBox Name="lst" Margin="5" ItemsSource="{StaticResource AuthorList}" />  

 

Listing 7

Summary

XAML supports collections including collection items and working with .NET collection types. In this article, we saw how to create a control with collection items and how to access its items dynamically.

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The WPF Expander represents a control with an expanded view where the contents of the expanded area can be expanded or collapsed.

The following XAML code shows how to create an Expander control in WPF.

<Expander Name="ExpanderControl" Header="Click to Expand"   
          HorizontalAlignment="Left" >  
    <TextBlock TextWrapping="Wrap" FontSize="14" FontWeight="Light" Foreground="Black">  
        This is an Expander control. Within this control, all contents will be wrapped.  
        At run-time, you may expand or collapse this control. Type more text here to be typed.  
        Jump around and hype.   
    </TextBlock>  
</Expander> 

The default view of an Expander control looks like this.


If you click on the header, the expanded view looks like this.



Most of the time, you would want the header of the Expander control to look different from the contents. This can be done by simply setting the font properties of the Expander control different from the contents.
 

This code sets the FontSize and FontWeight of the Expander control different from the contents of the Expander control. 

<Window x:Class="ExpanderControlSample.Window1"  
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"  
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"  
        Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">  
    <Grid>  
        <Expander Name="ExpanderControl" Background="LavenderBlush"   
          HorizontalAlignment="Left" Header="Click to Expand"   
          ExpandDirection="Down" IsExpanded="False" Width="200"  
                  FontSize="20" FontWeight="Bold" Foreground="Green">  
            <TextBlock TextWrapping="Wrap" >  
                This is an Expander control. Within this control, all contents will be wrapped.  
                At run-time, you may expand or collapse this control. Type more text here to be typed.  
                Jump around and hype.   
            </TextBlock>  
        </Expander>  
    </Grid>  
</Window> 

The new output looks like this. As you can see from this figure, the header of the Expander control is different from the contents.


How to create an Expander control dynamically

The Expander class in WPF represents an Expander control.

This code snippet creates an Expander control at run-time.

private void CreateDynamicExpander()  
{  
   Expander dynamicExpander = new Expander();  
   dynamicExpander.Header = "Dynamic Expander";  
   dynamicExpander.HorizontalAlignment = HorizontalAlignment.Left;  
   dynamicExpander.Background = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Lavender);  
   dynamicExpander.Width = 250;  
   dynamicExpander.IsExpanded = false;  
   dynamicExpander.Content = "This is a dynamic expander";  
  
   RootGrid.Children.Add(dynamicExpander);  

How to set the direction of an Expander Control
 

The ExpandDirection property of the Expander control sets the direction of the Header. It can be Up, Down, Left or Right. The following code snippet sets the ExpandDirection to Up.

<Expander Name="ExpanderControl" Background="LavenderBlush"   
          HorizontalAlignment="Left" Header="Click to Expand"   
          ExpandDirection="Up" IsExpanded="False" Width="200"  
                  FontSize="20" FontWeight="Bold" Foreground="Green">  
     <TextBlock TextWrapping="Wrap" >  
         This is an Expander control. Within this control, all contents will be wrapped.  
         At run-time, you may expand or collapse this control. Type more text here to be typed.  
         Jump around and hype.   
     </TextBlock>  
</Expander>

The control with Up direction looks like this.


How to set an image in an Expander Header

Expander.Header property may be used to style the header of an Expander control. Within the Header, you can set whatever contents you would like including an Image.
 

This code adds in image and text in the header of an Expander.

<Expander Name="ExpanderControl"   
  HorizontalAlignment="Left" Background="LavenderBlush"   
  ExpandDirection="Down"  IsExpanded="False" Width="250"  
          FontSize="20" FontWeight="Bold" Foreground="Green" >  
    <Expander.Header>  
        <BulletDecorator>  
            <BulletDecorator.Bullet>  
                <Image Width="50" Source="Flowers.jpg"/>  
            </BulletDecorator.Bullet>  
            <TextBlock Margin="20,0,0,0">Flower Header</TextBlock>  
        </BulletDecorator>  
    </Expander.Header>  
  
    <TextBlock TextWrapping="Wrap" FontSize="14" FontWeight="Light" Foreground="Black">  
        This is an Expander control. Within this control, all contents will be wrapped.  
        At run-time, you may expand or collapse this control. Type more text here to be typed.  
        Jump around and hype.   
    </TextBlock>  
</Expander>  

The control with an image header looks like this.


How to add scrolling to an Expander Control
 

Adding a Scrollviewer control in the contents of an Expander adds scrolling to the Expander. This code adds scrolling to the contents of an Expander. 

<Expander Name="ExpanderControl"   
  HorizontalAlignment="Left" Background="LavenderBlush"   
  ExpandDirection="Down"  IsExpanded="False" Width="250"  
          FontSize="20" FontWeight="Bold" Foreground="Green" >  
    <Expander.Header>  
        <BulletDecorator>  
            <BulletDecorator.Bullet>  
                <Image Width="50" Source="Flowers.jpg"/>  
            </BulletDecorator.Bullet>  
            <TextBlock Margin="20,0,0,0">Flower Header</TextBlock>  
        </BulletDecorator>  
    </Expander.Header>  
    <Expander.Content>  
        <ScrollViewer Height="100" VerticalAlignment="Top" >  
            <TextBlock TextWrapping="Wrap" FontSize="14" FontWeight="Light" Foreground="Black">  
                This is an Expander control. Within this control, all contents will be wrapped.  
                At run-time, you may expand or collapse this control. Type more text here to be typed.  
                Jump around and hype. This is an Expander control. Within this control, all contents will be wrapped.  
                At run-time, you may expand or collapse this control. Type more text here to be typed.  
                Jump around and hype.  
            </TextBlock>  
        </ScrollViewer>  
    </Expander.Content>  
</Expander> 

The Expander control with a scroll viewer looks like this.

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The WPF Frame control using XAML and C# supports content navigation within content. A Frame can be hosted within a WindowNavigationWindowPageUserControl, or a FlowDocument control.

How to create a Frame in WPF

This XAML code shows how to create a Frame control and sets its Source property to load a XAML page within it.

  1. <Window x:Class="FrameSample.Window1"  
  2.     xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"  
  3.     xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"  
  4.     Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">  
  5.     <Grid>          
  6.         <TextBlock>Outside area of frame</TextBlock>  
  7.         <Frame Source="Page1.xaml">              
  8.         </Frame>  
  9.     </Grid>  
  10. </Window>  

The Window looks like this. The Purple area is the Page1.xaml and the White area is outside of the frame.



Now you can manage the contents of a frame the way you want.

For example, the following code rotates the contents of the frame to a 45 degree angle.

  1. <Frame Source="Page1.xaml">  
  2.     <Frame.LayoutTransform>  
  3.         <RotateTransform Angle="45" />  
  4.     </Frame.LayoutTransform>  
  5. </Frame>  

The new output looks like this.



How to Navigate to a URI in a WPF Frame

The following code creates a Frame within a window and adds a button control to the window. On the button click event handler we will navigate to a URI using a Frame.

  1. <Window x:Class="FrameSample.Window1"  
  2.     xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"  
  3.     xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"  
  4.     Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">  
  5.     <Grid>  
  6.         <TextBlock>Outside area of frame</TextBlock>  
  7.         <Frame Name="FrameWithinGrid" >  
  8.         </Frame>  
  9.         <Button Height="23" Margin="114,12,25,0"   
  10.                 Name="button1" VerticalAlignment="Top" Click="button1_Click">Navigate to C# Corner  
  11.         </Button>  
  12.     </Grid>  
  13. </Window>  

The Navigate method of Frame is used to navigate to a URI. The following code navigates to Page1.xaml.

  1. private void button1_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)  
  2. {  
  3.     FrameWithinGrid.Navigate(new System.Uri("Page1.xaml",  
  4.              UriKind.RelativeOrAbsolute));  
  5. }  

The following code navigates to an external website URL and opens the ASPX page within a Frame.

  1. FrameWithinGrid.Source = new Uri("http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/Default.aspx", UriKind.Absolute);  

If you need to open a URI in a new browser window, the following code will do that. This code first creates a NavigationWindow and then sets its Source to a URI.

  1. NavigationWindow window = new NavigationWindow();  
  2. Uri source = new Uri("http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/Default.aspx", UriKind.Absolute);  
  3. window.Source = source; window.Show();  
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