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LogRotation in Linux

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I am trying to use logrotate but struggling with it and not able to get the desired result. Can someone help me with some pointers or so which I can apply to rotate the files.
Any example of configuration will be great.

posted Sep 18, 2013 by Salil Agrawal

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found this link http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/07/logrotate-examples/ looks to be complete.

1 Answer

+1 vote

Please find the code snippet below to achieve log rotation.

# **import the below packages for logging.**
import logging
import logging.handlers

# **Get a logger object by providing a logger name, which should be unique.**
logger_name = "TEST_LOG"
lgr = logging.getLogger(logger_name)

# **Create rotating file handler object. Please update the below configuration's as required.**
# **maxbytes  is the max number of bytes that can be written in a file and backupcount  is the max no of files that will be created before log rotating.** 
filepath = "/roor/test.log"
logger_mode = "W"
maxbytes = 1000000
backupcount = 10

hdlr = logging.handlers.RotatingFileHandler(filepath,mode=logger_mode,maxBytes=int(maxbytes),backupCount=int(backupcount))

# **Define the format of log statement as required.**
fmtr = logging.Formatter('%(lineno)s %(asctime)s %(levelname)s %(message)s')

# **set the format object that was created above to handler object.**
hdlr.setFormatter(fmtr)

# **set the handler object to logger object.**
lgr.addHandler(hdlr)

# **set log level to logger object. log level are explained below.**
# Level            Numeric value
# CRITICAL   50
# ERROR      40
# WARNING    30
# INFO           20
# DEBUG      10
# NOTSET       0

lgr.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

# **You can start using the logger object for logging. For example**
lgr.debug("Good Luck !!!")

Please refer the below link for further info.
http://docs.python.org/release/2.6.8/library/logging.html?highlight=logging#module-logging

answer Sep 19, 2013 by Hemanth Anakapalle
Thanks Hemanth
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