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Top 12 deadly roads in the World you would never want to drive on

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About 1.3 million people die in traffic accidents every year. The World Health Organization has declared 2011-2021, "A decade of action for road safety." But while many of those deaths could be prevented by better driving, there are some roads that test the skill, and courage, of any driver.

Let's take a look at top 12 deadly roads in the World you would never want to drive on:

1. North Yungas Road, Bolivia

Also known as the “Road of Death” in the Yungas region of Bolivia. It is legendary for its extreme danger and the Inter-American Development Bank christened it as the “world’s most dangerous road”. One estimate is that 200 to 300 travellers are killed yearly along the road. The road includes cross markings on many of the spots where vehicles have fallen. It is a regular occurrence for buses and trucks to go tumbling to the valley below, especially when they try passing each other.

2. Jalalabad–Kabul Road, Afghanistan

Many roads have been dubbed "most dangerous," but the 65-kilometer stretch of highway from Jalalabad to Kabul has more claim than most, snaking through Taliban territory. But it's not the threat of insurgency that makes Highway 1 so dangerous -- it's a combination of the narrow, winding lanes that climb up to 600 meters through the Kabul gorge and the reckless Afghan drivers trying to overtake the heavily-burdened haulage trucks.

3. James Dalton Highway, Alaska

The Dalton Highway is a 667 km road in Alaska. It begins at the Elliott Highway, north of Fairbanks, and ends at Deadhorse near the Arctic Ocean and the Prudhoe Bay oil fields. Although appearing serene at first glance, is filled with potholes, small flying rocks carried by fast winds, and worst of all it runs through the middle of nowhere.

4. Karakoram Highway, Pakistan

The Karakoram highway links China and Pakistan at the Khunjerab Pass, at an altitude of 4,693 meters. It's prone to landslides and floods and to make matters worse, the road is unpaved in Pakistan. But it is still a tourist attraction, passing through some spectacular gorges along the old Silk Road. It has been named the "Friendship Highway" by the governments who built it, despite 810 Pakistani and 82 Chinese workers losing their lives during construction, mostly in landslides.

5. Guoliang Tunnel Road, China

The Guoliang Tunnel is carved along the side of and through a mountain in China. It may be hard to see in the photo, this road was hollowed out of the side of a mountain by several villagers from the town of Guoliang. Before the construction of this mountain pass the village was cut of from the rest of civilization by the surrounding cliffs. Although it doesn’t see much traffic, due to its construction it is inherently fairly dangerous.

6. The Zoji Pass, India

The Zoji La is a mountain road between Kashmir and Ladakh and it looks like little more than a dusty pathway through the western Himalayas. But it's a lifeline that keeps the people of Ladakh in touch with the rest of the world, although it's often cut off by heavy snow in winter. The nine-kilometer stretch of road meanders over the mountain at 3,528 meters, with no barrier on one side and just the hard rock face on the other. Definitely not for anyone suffering from vertigo or a fear of landslides.

7. Skippers Canyon Road, New Zealand

The Skippers Canyon Road, located in New Zealand, is unbelievably scary as it’s made from a very narrow cut in the middle of a sheer cliff face. This winding road actually requires a special permit to drive. If you do manage to get permission though, be ready for a slippery challenge and good luck if you run into someone coming from the other direction.

8. Los Caracoles Pass, Chile

These steep, dizzying bends slalom through the Andes between Uspallata in Argentina and Los Andes in Chile. The remote location, its elevation of 3,176 meters and the procession of articulated lorries make the drive even more frightening. There's no safety barrier either. Nonetheless, even tourist coaches use the road, at least when it's not cut off by snow in winter. An easier option is to go by air or take the Transandine Railway -- if it's ever brought back into service.

9. The Stelvio Pass, Italy

The Stelvio Pass located in Italy, at 9045 feet is the highest paved mountain pass in the Eastern Alps, and the second highest in the Alps, slightly below the Col de l’Iseran 9088 feet. Some roads look a lot more dangerous than they really are. With more hairpins than Helena Bonham Carter, the Stelvio Pass looks like a child’s scribble over the hills. The road climbs almost two kilometers and, with just a low concrete barrier between you and the steep mountain drop, it’s best not to look down. A bit too much speed on one of the road’s 60 180-degree corners could spell disaster.

10. The Widow-maker, United Kingdom

This scenic country road through England's Peak District was named by the Road Safety Foundation in 2010 as the United Kingdom's most dangerous road, with 34 fatal or serious accidents from 2006 to 2008. Many of the casualties are motorcyclists, who come to enjoy the wide open space and bucolic scenes. However, the road's treacherous bends, edged by steep embankments and stone walls, make it far more dangerous than it looks, leading to its grim local nickname, the "widow-maker."

11. Sichuan-Tibet Highway, China

The Sichuan-Tibet Highway, a high-elevation road between Chengdu and Tibet where landslides and rock avalanches are common, is undoubtedly part of the problem. It is a road with a record of over 7,500 deaths for every 100,000 drivers has reason to be feared. Due to rock slides, avalanches, and poor weather drivers should certainly use caution.

12. The coast roads, Croatia

In a country that experiences an average of 11,650 traffic accidents a year, it's no wonder that Croatia also makes it onto the Association for Safe International Road Travel's list of some of the world's most dangerous roads. Congestion and speeding are a problem along the Adriatic coastal roads, which are infamous in the region for their blind corners, sharp bends that cling to the cliff face as well as a frequent lack of safety barriers.

posted Aug 16, 2017 by Sahana

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Driving on Indian streets resemble strolling on a tight rope. You must be truly cautious with the wheels due to despicable street conditions that could test the persistence of even the most prepared drivers. Be that as it may, you truly merit an award on the off chance that you've driven on the accompanying Indian streets and roadways. These are truly numerous roadways to hell.

 

1. Zoji La Pass 

The flicker of an eye could arrive a vehicle straight down from an elevation of 3,538 meters! Zoji La Pass is one of the nation's most feared streets as it is horribly limited and secured in snow ooze round the season. You'll go over this course while advancing toward Leh from Srinagar. The pass is a noteworthy connection amongst Ladakh and Kashmir.

 

2. Neral-Matheran Road


This serpentine road will send your heart to your mouth for sure! The road, that goes up to Matheran from Neral, is as smooth as butter. But you cannot speed up due to its narrowness. If you don't want to drive it, there are many share taxis that take tourists in hoards right up to Matheran.

 

3. National Highway 22

The name 'interstate to damnation' appears to be more proper for this frightening parkway than the current unassuming National Highway 22. Touted as one of India's most unsafe interstates, the street here makes you slice through a mountain. Simultaneously, demise looms over you as precipices and passages all around. National Highway 22 was additionally highlighted in the History Channel's "IRT Deadliest Roads" TV arrangement for its poor support and risky condition.

 

4. Chang La 

Drivers experience windedness and sickness while going through this course. Chang La is secured with snow consistently and is monitored by the armed force because of its nearness to the Chinese outskirt. It is prudent to convey additional warm garments and a restorative unit with you, as the winds and atmosphere can be amazingly cruel. 

 

5. Leh-Manali Highway 

Driving on this course is a gigantic torment, in light of the fact that the highway is constantly "trafficked" and you move at a snail's pace. At the point when the snow-loaded street defrost with ice hurls, a few trucks and four-wheelers are said to have endured hopeless harm. 

 

6. Munnar Road 

Like the Neral-Matheran street, Munnar Road too has twisty turns and high slants. The sweet smell of new tea leaves will waft through your drive, however you will be irritated via rushed drivers who drive on the smooth go as though it were a motorbike runway! 

 

7. Three level Zig Zag Road 

Situated in Sikkim, these winding streets make for the most grand perspectives. At 11,200 ft over the ocean level, this street will give you the best perspective of the Himalayan crown. The breathtaking streets will send your head into a hissy fit regardless of the fact that you're perched on the secondary lounge. You require exceptional licenses to go through, as the street is not for the timid!

 

8. Khardung La Pass 

Under the armed force's nearby investigation, this pass is secured with clasp turns that will have the most prepared drivers frightful. Khardung La Pass gives you a passage to Nubra Valley and stays shut every year from October to May because of cruel conditions. 

 

9. Kishtwar-Kailash Road 

In 2013, competitor Mick Fowler and his climbing accomplice, Paul Ramsden, archived their way through the most risky Kishtwar-Kailash street. The one path way, which crosses through the recently framed J&K area, is dangerous to the point that it will make your GPS quit working for you. The ascension is awful, and one rushed move could arrive you on your deathbed. 

 

10. Rajmachi Road 

The graveled street arranged in the Sahyadris has a hustle-clamor of trekkers and bikers. The way gets dangerous amid the storms, which makes it troublesome for riders to ride on it. 

 

11. Kinnaur Road 

Kinnaur street will flabbergast you with its bluff hanging drives and dim tight openings. A modest slip-up, and you will sprinkle into the Baspa stream that will take no opportunity to swallow you. The valley street stays shut amid substantial snowfall. On the off chance that you ever get an opportunity to go through along these lines, please make an effort to remain additional watchful around the perilous Taranda dhank which is scandalous for asserting lives. 

 

12. Nathu La Pass 

This pass is said to be the most elevated motorable street on the planet. It is one of the three open exchanging fringe posts amongst China and India and is found 54 km east of Gangtok, the capital of Sikkim, and 430 km from Lhasa, the capital of Tibet. The street here gets hindered because of monstrous avalanches and snow slime, making driving a terrible affair here.

 

13. Valparai Tirupati ghat 

It is difficult to achieve the most swarmed sanctuary on earth. Tirupati has a ghat which is entirely hazardous and inclined to mischances. You must be additional watchful while going through the turns and turns that are rich out and about. 

 

14. Gata Loops 

It's a progression of twenty one fastener twists that you will go over when you're driving on the Leh-Manali carport. The street is said to be spooky by a phantom of a traveler who was covered here. Individuals offer cigarettes and mineral water on the spot and afterward go ahead with their excursion. 

 

15. Pune-Mumbai Expressway 

Aside from avalanches, the Pune-Mumbai road has a huge amount of reckless drivers surpassing and crisscrossing their direction, which causes some genuine mishaps. There are likewise situations where drivers have dozed in the driver's seat, because of weariness and lack of sleep. A report uncovers that around 14,186 mischances occurred on the interstate between January 2006 and August 2014 and 925 individuals kicked the bucket between January 2006 and June 2013. Further examinations uncovered that 60% of mischances happened because of inconsiderateness and human mistake. 

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1. Kinnaur Road

Kinnaur Road is a scenic cliff-hanging drive through the seemingly bottomless Baspa river gorge in Sangla Valley in Kinnaur district of Himachal Pradesh, India. 

2. Bara-Lacha Pass

Bara-lacha la also known as Bara-lacha Pass, or Bārā Lācha La,(el. 4,890 m or 16,040 ft) is a high mountain pass in Zanskar range, connecting Lahaul district in Himachal Pradesh to Ladakh in Jammu and Kashmir, situated along the Leh–Manali Highway.

3. Khardung La Road

Khardung La. is a mountain pass located in the Ladakh region of the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. The local pronunciation is "Khardong La" or "Khardzong La," but, as with most names in Ladakh, the romanised spelling varies.

4. Munnar Road

A narrow Zig-Zag road starting from Kochi. Mist and fog in the Nilgiri ranges is treacherous, and combine this with dangerous high altitude roads without embankments makes a perfect situation for a thriller.

5. Saach Pass Road

Sach Pass is a 14500 ft high mountain pass in Chamba District, Himachal Pradesh, India on the Pir Panjal Range of the Himalayas. It is 127 km (79 mi) from the District Headquarters. It connects the Chamba valley with the Pangi valleys of Himachal Pradesh, India.

6. Keylong Kishtwar Road

Terrifying high mountain trail, with a length of 233 km, located in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, linking Keylong and Kishtwar. It’s incredibly disorienting to look over the edge, or even just to see the valleys a couple thousand feet below you. It’s a mind numbing vertical drop of hundreds of meters so you might want to give it a miss on a windy day.

7. Kunzum La Road

Kunzum Pass is a high mountain pass on the eastern Kunzum Range of the Himalayas some 122 km (76 mi) from Manali. It connects the Kullu Valley and Lahaul Valley with the Spiti Valley of Himachal Pradesh, India. It is on the route to Kaza the subdivisional headquarters of Spiti. There is also a 9 km trek to the Moon Lake of the Chandratal from the Kunzum Pass.

I

8. Kolli Hills

70 continuous hairpin bends take you to the Kolli Malai or “The Mountains Of Death”. They are actually continuous. It definitely gives us goosebumps.

9. Jalori Pass

This pass is the nearest mountain pass from Delhi. It is located at a height of 10,800 ft. above the sea level in the Kullu district of Himachal Pradesh. There are restaurants to take lunch at its top but it is no an easy task reaching there.

10. Rohtang Pass Road

Rohtang Pass  is a high mountain pass on the eastern Pir Panjal Range of the Himalayas around 51 km (32 mi) from Manali. It connects the Kullu Valley with the Lahaul and Spiti Valleys of Himachal Pradesh, India.

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Although scientists estimate that there could be upwards of 30 million animal species on the planet, a number of those species are teetering on the verge of extinction due to man’s thirst for consumption or entertainment. Hunted for meat, for fur, and for other materials governments around the world are cracking down on poaching and illegal hunting practices.

Let's take a look at the 10 Most Endangered Animals in the World:

1. Hawksbill Turtle

With a range that covers all the world's tropical and sub-tropical seas, the hawksbill turtle population has decreased by 80% over the last three generations. The major threat facing the hawksbill turtle is the tortoiseshell trade. In the last 100 years, millions have been killed for their shells. Habitat destruction by human beach front development, excessive collection of their eggs, and poaching for meat are other major threats to their survival.

2. South China Tiger

It is also known as the Amoy found in the forests of South China. Its size is smaller than other sorts of the tiger. It is the most critically threatened cat. Only approximately 30-50 of them remaining. China hunts it at a very high rate. Which has become the greatest threat to wiping them out of the face of earth. To help save this tiger today the WWF is planning to introduce captive-bred tigers into the forests.

3. Saola

The saola, also known as the Asian unicorn, was first discovered by scientists in May 1992. They have only been found in the Annamite Mountains of Vietnam and Laos. The nickname unicorn relates to their two sharp horns, which can reach up to 20 inches (51 centimeters). Saola means “spindle horns” in Vietnamese. They are cousins of cattle, goats and antelope.

4. Sumatran Orangutan

It is one of the two species of orangutan, which is found in Indonesia on the island of Sumatra. Only eight orangutans that are presently kept in quarantine cages at the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme at the Quarantine Centre are remaining because they require long time care due to disability and health related issues and they can therefore not be released into the wild just yet. The greatest threat for the Orangutan is the extensive destruction of the Sumatran rainforest by human activities such as logging, mining, construction of roads and it is also cleared to provide land for farming, which has made them easy targets for poaching because their population is left isolated and fragmented. In the process of capture and transport, approximately 6-8 of them die every day.

5. Amur Leopard

Unlike its southern cousins, the Amur leopard has adapted to live in the cold, temperate forests of southeast Russia and northeast China. Its winter fur is the longest of any leopards, with each hair growing to 3 inches (7 centimeters) long. It’s estimated there are only about 60 of these unique cats left. With such a low population, a distinct threat to their survival is inbreeding. Researchers have found hazardously low genetic diversity in the existing leopards. Also, cub survival rates have been decreasing for decades, which is likely due to genetic abnormalities.

6. Vaquita

Vaquita is the rarest marine mammal in the world. Its body is gray with a white stomach, and around the eyes, it has dark patches. Of the seven species of the Vaquita, it is the smallest and the only one that in the Eastern Pacific Ocean where waters are warm. They live in a tiny area in the Gulf of California in the north. According to the WWF, only 30 vaquitas are remaining. The greatest threat is accidental deaths when they get got in gillnets that are meant to catch other marine species. If a ban on the gillnet is not enforced, then they will become extinct very fast and probably by 2018.

7. Mountain Gorilla

Dian Fossey’s research work with the mountain gorillas of Rwanda brought them international attention. Despite increased conservation efforts, only two populations of gorillas remain today in four national parks in Rwanda, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Mountain gorillas live in high mountain regions, at elevations of 8,000 to 13,000 feet (2,400 to 4000 meters). Their long fur allows them to tolerate sometimes freezing temperatures. Adults can weigh up to 440 pounds (200 kilograms), and stand over five feet tall when they’re up on two legs.

8. Pangolin

Pangolin is the only mammal whose entire body is covered with scales. They have large, curved claws for digging termite and ant nests. They are used to draw barks from trees and pulling logs so as to find their insect prey. Also, they are known as scaly anteaters, and they are increasingly becoming victims of illegal poaching in Asia and Africa where they are found. Their meat is a delicacy while their scales are highly valued. Only eight species of the pangolin exist today with four species living in Asia and another four species in Africa. International and national laws protect these pangolins. These species are on the list of Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

9. Javan Rhinoceros

This is the most endangered rhinoceros in the world, with only 63 animals surviving in a national park in Indonesia. They are also potentially the rarest large mammals on earth. Very little is known about the Javan rhino’s way of life. They live in extremely dense jungle, making them difficult to study. Adults live alone and only come together occasionally to mate. Their days are typically spent wallowing in mud holes, which they might deepen with their feet and horns for extra comfort.

10. Giant Panda

It is also known as panda bear. Gaint panda originates from central China. It is a treasure here in China and is adored all over the world. This panda has white and black colors on its body. Researches shows that adult pandas can live up to 30 years. However, this is not always the case. Because both the Cubs and adult pandas die because of many predators such as the yellow-throated martens and the snow leopard that kill and consume this animal. In particular, pandas are in danger of extinction due to loss and disintegration of habitat, and by people hunting other animals and harvesting plants from the forests. The most depraving thing is that they are also vulnerable to the loss of habitat and destruction.

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Colours are beautiful, colours are everywhere. Colours are what make our life so very special, and grab our attention and give us inspiration in this otherwise sullen, drab world. What if you could live in a city filled with such magical colours, and walk through streets that are a constant reminder of the rainbow?

Let’s take a look at the 10 Most Colorful Cities in the World:

1. Burano, Venice, Italy

It’s easy to spot the Venetian Island of Burano from the sea. The jewel-colored homes act like a beacon, which is what they were intended to be. According to island lore, local fisherman started painting their homes in bright colors hues of orange, red, yellow, and purple so they could see them while out fishing in the fog and could follow their colors back home. Now, the practice has become law, and if you live on the island and want to paint your home, you must ask for permission from the government, who will assign your home a color.  For visitors, the homes are just a welcome dose of cheerfulness.

2. Bo-Kaap, Cape Town, South Africa

Bo-Kaap (also written Bo Kaap) is a multicultural neighborhood in Cape Town, South Africa, that is known for its brightly painted buildings and cobblestone streets. Formerly known as the Malay Quarter, it has been a predominantly Muslim district for more than a century, and it has one of South Africa's oldest mosques. Most inhabitants' ancestors are from the Indian subcontinent and insular Southeast Asia. Afrikaans has long been the language of this community, though English continues to gain ground. The historic two-story homes and bright paint schemes (pictured) have made this neighborhood a popular stop for tourist photo ops.

3. Willemstad, Curacao

The dazzling colors that adorn the capital city of this Caribbean island stem from an unlikely source headaches. According to local lore, back in the 1800s the governor of the Dutch colony decided that the color white caused his migraines. He issued a decree that buildings could be painted anything but white. Today, this jewel-colored city is an almost perfectly preserved Dutch colonial trading settlement with a UNESCO World Heritage designation.

4. Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

The capital of the Indian state of Rajasthan, Jaipur is known as the Pink City. With a few exceptions, all the buildings within the historic city center are pink. This unusual color choice dates to the 19th century when a Rajasthani king ordered all buildings to be painted pink ahead of a visit by England's Prince Albert, the Prince of Wales, in 1876. The color choice was meant to evoke a sense of hospitality and welcoming. The unique visual appeal of Jaipur is enhanced by its architecture. The City Palace, Amber Fort and Hawa Mahal (pictured) are a few popular sites, while a host of temples, gardens and squares allow people the chance to fill out their sightseeing itinerary.

5. St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

Perhaps the most notable feature of the provincial capital of Newfoundland and Labrador is the row of colorful Victorian homes that runs through downtown. Called “jellybean houses” due to their wild red, blue, yellow, and green hues, the houses fill St. John’s with splashes of whimsy. Most of the homes are done with tasteful white trim, but others opt for a bit of discord with the color schemes. The colors began to appear in the 1970s, and many suspect this was done to cheer up a declining urban center. Whatever the origin, the homes are a bright spark on the island, particularly when the gray days of winter set in.

6. Valparaiso, Chile

This port city is the historical and cultural hub of Chile, with a wide array of museums, cathedrals, churches and colonial buildings. The coastal area is where beautiful boats, cruising this region, stop at. What’s even more magnificent about this part of the city is the multi-hued urban sprawl adorning the sea. The homes and the bohemian murals on the walls are a manifestation of the creative spirits of the citizens, and result in creating a splendour, especially from the acensores along the funiculars that provide a bird-eye view.

7. Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India

India’s Blue City, tucked into the Western state of Rajasthan, is a colorful reminder of India’s caste system. In the past, Brahmins, the so-called upper class, painted their homes in the royal hue of blue to differentiate their properties from those of the lower class. Over time, others just mirrored the effect. Even the city's Mehrangarh Fort got a solid coat of blue. Many suspect the color is now popular for a number of reasons including tradition. The blue paint’s chemical composition might be a good defense against termites, the color keeps dwellings cool in the blazing sun, and the vivid color is downright beautiful.

8. Guanajuato, Mexico

Located in the mountains of Central Mexico, Guanajuato was once a center of the silver mining industry. Visitors can trace the city's past by visiting the many 16th century plazas and churches scattered throughout the hillsides. Brightly painted buildings are found all around Guanajuato. Unlike many Mexican cities, this place is free from traffic jams. The narrow streets are simply too difficult for cars to navigate. Despite the pleasant setting, there are not many tourists in Guanajuato. Most visitors seem to prefer the similarly historic (but less colorful) San Miguel de Allende, about an hour away.

9. Chefchaouen, Morocco

The small and beautiful Chefchaouen city is nestled in the Rif Mountains of Northwest Morocco. This popular tourist town is known for its striking vivid blue-washed buildings. The bluish design of this city was introduced by Jewish refugees in 1930. The blue color considers as symbol of sky and heaven in Judaism. It also represents people must live their lives with spiritual awareness. The natives of Chefchaouen regularly repaint the buildings in blue shade in the memory of that old Jewish tradition and to keep the history alive. This bluish village glows differently in different time of a day. In Wet condition Chefchaouen also look like a clear blue water world.

10. Santorini, Greece

When you think of the Greek island of Santorini, it's likely that two colors come to mind: White, which is the color of many buildings' walls, and blue, which is not only the color of the roofs, but of the sparkling Ionian sea the laps at the island's shore. In fact, the building facades of the city of Oia feature a number of other colors, but the blues and whites are so dazzling it's easy to simply fixate on them. Another surefire way to appreciate the vibrant rainbow of Oia is to take your shots at sunset on a clear day, when the prismatic sky casts its colorful light on the darkened cityscape.

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